$1,100 Camera vs $6,000 Camera: Understanding the Differences

As the saying goes, “you get what you pay for.” But how does that rule flesh out with DSLRs? Why is a $6,000 camera 6 times (and $5,000) better than a $1,000 camera? Photographer and filmmaker Peter McKinnon wants to show you.

McKinnon—whose YouTube channel has exploded in popularity over the last few months—has a knack for creating the tutorials people want to watch and answering the questions people want answered. This video falls into the latter category, and it tackles one of the biggest questions: camera cost.

Like any photographer, McKinnon gets a lot of questions about “what camera should I buy?” And so he created a video comparing the capabilities of the $1,100 Canon 80D against the $6,000 Canon 1DX Mark II. (Not sure where McKinnon got the $8,000 figure he uses in the video… but we’ll let that slide for now).

This isn’t a “which camera is better” comparison. It should be obvious that the 1DX Mark II is far more capable, technically speaking. It should also be obvious that the 80D might be “better” in some situations and the 1DX “better” in others—there is not “better” gear only the right gear for the situation.

The video is about breaking down the specs, features, and capabilities you’re paying for when you upgrade your DSLR from a prosumer model to a professional monster.

If you’ve ever wondered what an extra $5,000 gets you in terms of cameras, check out Peter’s explanation up top. And if you do decide to upgrade to a monster like the 1D soon, good for you… just don’t be like this guy.

from PetaPixel http://ift.tt/2ojPKoa

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